Riverlogue

This blog originates on the banks of the Atchafalaya River, in Louisiana. It proposes to share the things that happen on and by the river as the seasons progress. As the river changes from quiet, warm, slow flow to rises of eighteen feet or more, there are changes in the lives of the birds, fish, amphibians and reptiles that use the river. And the mood of the river changes with the seasons. I propose to note and comment on these things.

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Location: Butte La Rose, Louisiana, United States

I transitioned a few years ago from a career as a water-pollution control biologist. I want to do this blog to stay in touch with a world outside my everyday surroundings, whatever they may be. I like open-minded company and the discussion of ideas. Photo by Brad Moon.

Monday, August 17, 2009

Five Candles







Just a whim, this. A couple days ago I took pictures of water hyacinth flowers for my "Life at Butte La Rose" catalogue and was surprised to find candles burning in every flower. Had never noticed them before. How many times (hundreds) had I looked at these flowers? Apparently not enough times to see them.



The river is at 7.5 on the Butte La Rose gauge. It will be at about 2.8 feet in a week. That is a FAST drop. The Mississippi and Ohio are emptying out to the low end of the cycle.


Rise and Shine, Jim


2 Comments:

Blogger Rita said...

I just now read your comment on the water hyacinths. I use to put them in my fish ponds about 9 yrs ago, then one hard winter they died out. After that, Alabama has banned them due to being so prolific I guess. What keeps them from being a pest plant in the basin? Also, any comments on the oil spill? How will it affect the basin?
Thanks!
Rita

June 19, 2010 9:43 PM  
Blogger jim said...

The simple answer is that nothing keeps them from being a pest in the Basin. They have been a pest for longer than my lifetime and will continue to be. An extensive spray program keeps them in check in some places, in others they just remain a problem. Very cold winters kills them, but they come right back.

So far there are no direct environmentatl effects on the Basin above the coastline. I do have a concern that there may be effects on organisms that commute with the coastal waters for part of their life cycle, but it will take time for that to show up, if it does. Thanks for the comment.
Jim

June 20, 2010 10:14 AM  

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